Night Market

From Wikimacs

Night Market was introduced in 2001 and modeled after a traditional Taiwanese night market with food and games (but lacking street vendors, bubble tea machines, and beggars); essentially, it is a carnival with a Chinese twist. Traditonally held on Wednesday nights, each camper recieves tickets (later separated into blue and red, for food and games/prizes, respectively) to use at the Night Market. Campers have the option of spending their tickets in a number of ways, namely for games, food, or prizes. Most of the games are gambling based, where the camper bets a certain number of tickets that he or she will win the game.

At the conclusion of Night Market, there is usually an marquee event for those who choose to hoarde their tickets; some campers have been known to possess upwards of 300 tickets through hoarding and combining with others! From 2001 to 2003, there was a Counselor Auction, in which each camp group, (or groups if they teamed up), could compete to bid on a number of counselors. The group(s) that won each counselor would be able to command that counselor as their servant for a day.

Starting in 2004, as the tasks given to the counselor-servants got out of hand, campers were instead allowed to bid on the opportunity to pie a counselor, as in throw a shaving cream pie at their face. In 2004 and 2005, 25 tickets bought a long range shot, while 50 tickets bought a closer shot. However, the number of pies sold were unlimited and the event became tediously long and messy. In 2006, the number of pies was limited to 10 and auctioned via sealed bid; since the pies were limited, the winning bidders were allowed to simply smear the pie in the counselor's face.

Usually, Amy Chou had the most tickets, but in 2006, Amy had less than Leo.


Games played at Night Market: Game-O-Rama, 24, Blackjack, Pictionary, Lollipop Pick, Darts, Jellybean Transfer, Wisemen, Basketball Shoot, Ping Pong Toss, Whack-a-Counselor, Flame Shoot, DDR
Non-gaming activites: Nail Polish, Face Paint

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